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St. Georges absinthe

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St. Georges absinthe

Postby Bobtuse » Wed Oct 13, 2010 8:49 pm

Nice video and some good still porn.

Note the 102C temp at around 1:51. What's up with that? Steam temp?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxOGv6jH ... ata_player
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby Izzy_Britton » Wed Oct 13, 2010 11:44 pm

I am curios to know what is that in the big glass jar in the fridge with the martini glass with something in it inside that jar.
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby Rednose » Thu Oct 14, 2010 1:02 pm

Nice vid, thanks for that.

I'm making a commercial Pernod like likker, also have an absinthe but never could get right the color part so helped with foodgrade color.

That's not the real thing as we are artisan folks and the likker should be made in natural way, now the guy in the vid says that they don't shit, they see the light caramel color as a "honest" color, good argument, have to revise my opinion on that. :)

Last night I saw who is trying to distroy my small wormwood plantation, they are bloody aunts and carry the leaves to their home, tonight will start a war with them. :x
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby EcuBrew » Fri Oct 15, 2010 1:28 pm

Caramel is made by burning sugars but as far as I know caramel is a carcinogenic Joe. You may want to research that.

I am very sensitive (canary in the coal mine type) and from my own experience I have found that it looks like anything that's roasted a little too dark easily make me feel nauseated or even sick. I can't have coffee and over time I found out that even some darker amber beers don't make me feel better. Dark beers in general I can't touch, except for Juinness() or some stouts and no, I only drink a few glasses at a time or should I say a day :wink: . What they all have in common is that they have roasted components in them.

Even though I am very sensitive, it may be an indication that some things are not really good for anyone.

There is of course also the combination with alcohol that tends to multiply the effects of certain components.
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby Rednose » Fri Oct 15, 2010 1:40 pm

Werner, the color is initially made by green leaves but with the time it get a light caramel brown color.

I have tried everything to maintain the color but it always gets brownish.

They use 60% ABV as I understand, I tried 73% ABV as I was reading that this ABV will maintain the natural green color but didn't work neiter. :(

My Absinthe is really delicious but I can't get the color right, maybe I will leave it just clear. :idea:

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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby EcuBrew » Fri Oct 15, 2010 2:53 pm

I see Joe. I thought you were adding caramel.
They use caramel by the 220L drum here at the local brewery.

Clear doesn't look bad, as long as you can consistently keep it that way when you are commercial. You know what customers are like eh? Even when a next batch of a product is 10x better than the previous, if it's different then it's not good in their eyes.
That's one of the reasons I like doing a lot of things myself: it's always different (even though others don't always notice it), so it's never boring and every time a new adventure.
Customers are spoiled rotten these days, both the consumers' and producers' fault. I am sure that's one of the subjects we'll discuss in the future.
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby aquavitae » Fri Oct 15, 2010 6:15 pm

Petit Wormwood (artemisia pontica), hyssop (hyssopus officinalis) and lemon balm (melissa officinalis) will keep the colour green, at least according to this recipe for "Swiss Absinthe of Pontarlier from Bedel, 1899".
http://www.feeverte.net/recipes.html#27
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby jaerp » Fri Oct 15, 2010 6:38 pm

Rednose wrote:Werner, the color is initially made by green leaves but with the time it get a light caramel brown color.

I have tried everything to maintain the color but it always gets brownish.

They use 60% ABV as I understand, I tried 73% ABV as I was reading that this ABV will maintain the natural green color but didn't work neiter. :(

My Absinthe is really delicious but I can't get the color right, maybe I will leave it just clear. :idea:

Joe


yeah, that's a real conundrum. as someone who enjoys absinthe from time to time, the color doesn't influence my decisions (unless it is electric green or bright red, then it's usually a pass). but if you're making something to sell, yeah, that could be a huge stumbling block. sometimes i believe making a small sacrifice for the sake of business is okay, but it is ultimately up to the owner and artisan to draw that line.
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby Rednose » Fri Oct 15, 2010 6:50 pm

I'm living in a country where many people don't have a great drinking culture.

I presented to one guy (he wasn't a brick layer) a rum and told him it's whiskey and he went away with that story after drinking half bottle. :shock:

I think that folks here will forgive an artisan likker that it tast different from batch to batch, most will not notice the difference, what they will not forgive and that is reasonable is that one bottle doesn't make you hangover and the other does, so distilling quality is important always.

I have to decide the color before going with it in the market, that's for sure, and it have to stay in that color forever.

To the green color: I can't get petite wormwood here, the common one I seeded and it's getting well (beside of the bloody aunts :ranting: ) but the petite didn't grow by seeds. :(
Don't ever take a fence down until you know why it was put up. ~Robert Frost
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby Sbeghan » Fri Oct 15, 2010 8:53 pm

Yeah, petite wormwood can be bloody difficult to grow from seeds, you'll have to have someone ship it to you. Hopefully I will have some next year. If you can also get your hands on Veronica officinalis you can try that to help conserve the green colour. So far I'm getting my best results with that, and doing the colouration step with 80%+ EtOH, and then bottling it in a dark brown wine bottle and sticking it away from light. Also, the less broken down your herbs are (no powder!) during the colouring step the less likely you are to get precipitates as well...

Being that you're from Ecuador why don't you try a rouge? Use your basic blanche recipe, maybe adding a bit of citrus to it (just a hint, maybe 1-5g of zest per bottle?) during the distillation, and then colour with roselle (hibiscus calyx). Try using about 30g of calyx per 1L of absinthe and keep it warm for 15-30 minutes, it makes a beautiful deep garnet and the flavour is good. I add petite wormwood to my rouge during colouring as well for the flavour...

I'm trying to think of a substitute you could use. Its scent reminds me a lot of sagebrush (another Artemisia that grows wild in the midwest in NA), but its also a bit like white sage (though not very much, but maybe you could use sage?).
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby Rednose » Fri Oct 15, 2010 9:15 pm

Sbeghan wrote:
(just a hint, maybe 1-5g of zest per bottle?)

I use citrus for infusion liquors with great results but the green chlorofil (need a dictionary) I can't get to work, even under high ABV.

Not sure if I can get Hibiscus in the cost, I have seen them in the highlands though.

Another difficulty is that I can't get green or amber bottles here, I would have to import them.

Thanks for your input any idea is welcome. :)

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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby Sbeghan » Sat Oct 16, 2010 10:41 pm

Can you get that emerald green, and just have problems with it fading, or does it just come out brown or brown-green?

I've never had a problem getting emerald green using freshly dried herbs, and even sometimes fresh herbs. Heck, I've boiled wax myrtle and pine needles in lab alcohol and it extracted dark green. I think its just a matter of using very high alcohol %. Maybe try taking 95% neutral and colouring that in the herbs, and then adding that to absinthe blanche?

Really, they only sell wine in white bottles? Distributors don't even sell brown?
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby Oracle » Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:21 pm

Rednose, how fast does the green color go from green to "tan" or "brown" ("feuille morte")? Much of the commercial "verte" absinthe that I have collected changes color over time, whether the bottles have been opened or not. It does seem to change faster in clear bottles than in the dark tinted bottles. I do have a few that seem to have very stable green colors (they look natural, not some added food color), but have no clue how they stabilized it.

Nevertheless, regarding the stabilization of chlorophyll, there are probably many factors to consider, but take a look at this document:

http://media.iupac.org/publications/pac/2006/pdf/7808x1477.pdf

The author points out that acidic conditions tend to push chlorophyll to pheophytin (yellow-brown) transition. He also mentions that copper has a protective effect on chlorophyl (so perhaps carrying out the coloration step in a copper vessel may help extend the stability of your product).

I have only run a few batches of absinthe (colored, anyway) and the green has not been very stable. I did not try the copper strategy, nor have I checked the pH, but I plan to follow this more closely with my next batch.
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby Rednose » Sun Nov 28, 2010 6:48 pm

Sbeghan wrote:Can you get that emerald green, and just have problems with it fading, or does it just come out brown or brown-green?


Sorry Sbeghan and Oracle, I just saw this posts.

Yes, I get the green color, it keeps about a month, than it gets like JD color, it's a too short shelf time to sell it.

Where I live we have a huge ammount of sunlight (good for solar energy), that makes it to change so fast.

Maybe at the end I just food color it or never go in the market with it (only personal and hotel use), who knows?
Don't ever take a fence down until you know why it was put up. ~Robert Frost
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Re: St. Georges absinthe

Postby Sbeghan » Sun Nov 28, 2010 10:48 pm

Interesting comments about copper and pH influencing color stability. One thing that I've found is that sugar seems to stabilize it - my creme de menthe and limecello is still green after a year in clear bottles with indirect sunlight. You might consider selling the absinthe as a creme - drops out the spoon step and keeps retards from reaching for a lighter. I still think a dark green (good) or brown bottle (best) would be good.

Anyhow, rednose, I can try to ship you some petite wormwood (live) next year.

Also, if you add the finishing herbs to the maceration instead and distill you'll still capture most of the flavor minus some of the mouthfeel and bitterness from the petite wormwood. The product also won't form that cloudy coagulate that its wont to do. You could then mix up food colouring to try to attain that emerald green that most people expect...
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