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enzymes

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enzymes

Postby pintoshine » Thu Mar 01, 2012 12:30 am

Today I tested a batch of enzymes. I purchased a series of enzymes a couple weeks ago to help with some difficult recipes. I had time today to try the hardest test I could construct.
I decided to do straight corn starch. I added .5 kg to 4 L water. Adjusted ph to 5.6 with citric acid.
Let me tell you that getting that much starch even to go into cold water is a task. The stuff is repels water.
Then I added 0.5 ml of the High Temperature amylase per instructions. I raised the stuff to 82C and cycled between 79 and 82 for 90 minutes. Complete liquid and never had an issue with viscosity. Dropped the ph to 5.0 per instructions.
I cooled to 65 and added the 0.5 ml beta-amylase and cycled between 65 and 62. There was total conversion after 55 minutes. I added calcium oxide to neutralize the citric acid. This was a titration thing and was a bit trial and error. Had to add small amounts until the indicator said it was neutral. The insoluble calcium citrate floated during the boil and allowed me to skim most of it off. I then boiled it down syrup. At 104.5C the big bubbles indicated finished syrup.
The resulting syrup is extremely sweet. I can't measure the brix but it is very high. The sg is off the wine hydrometer.

I had a productive day. Since I had to pay for a large quantity of these enzymes, I am going to make them available to you guys.
30, 60 and 120 ml sizes. The kit will contain both the high temperature alpha and the broad ph beta.
I still have a lot of work to do with labels and bottles and such.

0.5ml of each per 0.5k of starch is pretty awesome. I'll be repeating this with 100% corn and potatoes too.
I'll make sure to get video next time.

Update: I used my triple beam balance scale and found that the sg is actually 1.314 giving me 65 Brix. Now that is good syrup. Also that gives me 385 g sugar from 454 g starch. That is much better than I have been able to get using barley malt.
Distill safe. Make good cuts. Enjoy yourself. Give as much as you take. Have fun doing this incredibly hard work. Be a good example. It's your hobby.
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Re: enzymes

Postby Swede » Thu Mar 01, 2012 12:48 am

Any sources that an average hobbyist could buy these from pint?
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Re: enzymes

Postby pintoshine » Thu Mar 01, 2012 1:09 am

I will be offering these soon.
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Re: enzymes

Postby Abussive » Thu Mar 01, 2012 7:50 am

That seems quite an advancement of the "art" to me Pint!
I'm not used to all these Brix things..... just a check:
Your syrup is "65 Brix" and I'm deducing that this means its around 650g of sugar per litre. From 500g of starch.
(Onlooking mathematicians, don't panic! Chemistry is full of products that appear to outweigh the weight of just ONE of the reactants....remember that in hydrolysing the starch with enzyme, it's incorporating water into the Product: sugar)


Pretty darned impressive and I'd think a "must have" for anyone finding the cost of sugar becoming prohibitive.
To say nothing about other advantages (flavour etc)....

On the chemistry bit, did you mean you used "slaked" lime ?
(Calcium oxide - "quicklime" - converted into soluble calcium hydroxide, by the careful addition of water. It gets hot when you do this!)

I think this will be a Big Thing in due course for all AD-ers here.
Do we have a Monthly Medal for the best posting?
I'd vote this one.
:)
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Re: enzymes

Postby rockchucker22 » Thu Mar 01, 2012 8:25 am

I too have been playing around with enzymes. It has made ag much simpler. What I'm courious about is the high temp alpha, is it different than regular alpha? What is the temp difference between the two?With beta I always add at room temp or around 60f. I buy the enzymes 1 lb at a time, this seems to be enough for about 6 months of regular distilling.
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Re: enzymes

Postby pintoshine » Thu Mar 01, 2012 9:27 am

On the chemistry bit, did you mean you used "slaked" lime ?
(Calcium oxide - "quicklime" - converted into soluble calcium hydroxide, by the careful addition of water. It gets hot when you do this!)

In a 4L batch of this stuff it took less than a gram to get the ph down to 5.6 or so. So adding enough dry, calcium oxide, made from calcium carbonate and heating quite hot for a long time, which I get from the Mexican food section called Cal. you are right about adding lots of this stuff to water as it would get hot. I only have to add a few milligrams and at an already high temperature.
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Re: enzymes

Postby Abussive » Thu Mar 01, 2012 10:06 am

pintoshine wrote:
On the chemistry bit, did you mean you used "slaked" lime ?
(Calcium oxide - "quicklime" - converted into soluble calcium hydroxide, by the careful addition of water. It gets hot when you do this!)

In a 4L batch of this stuff it took less than a gram to get the ph down to 5.6 or so. So adding enough dry, calcium oxide, made from calcium carbonate and heating quite hot for a long time, which I get from the Mexican food section called Cal. you are right about adding lots of this stuff to water as it would get hot. I only have to add a few milligrams and at an already high temperature.


That makes sense for the small amount of acid "mopping up" you needed.

[Did you notice the oxide glowing brightly once it was hot? That's the origin of the term "limelight".
Old-fashioned music halls used to balance a lump of lime in a flame to generate bright, white light to shine onto the stage.
Not perfect, but a big improvement over candles! All this before they tried thorium instead, then arc lights.....]
:)
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Re: enzymes

Postby rockchucker22 » Thu Mar 01, 2012 7:53 pm

Deleted!
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Re: enzymes

Postby mikejwoodnz » Thu Mar 01, 2012 8:40 pm

rockchucker22 wrote:Weird how I contribute,ask pertinent questions, and they go ignored. Thought this was the easy to get along with group, friendly and such. Not so! :!:


OK this is what Google has to say :
http://www.enzymeinchina.com/3-alpha-amylase.html
"High temperature alpha amylase is a bacterial amylase preparation derived from Bacillus licheniformis extract. With great resistance to high temperature, "

So I guess it can sustain or endure a "higher" temperature without compromising it's action - therefore more suitable for the vagaries of those who do it themselves :D
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Re: enzymes

Postby rockchucker22 » Thu Mar 01, 2012 9:12 pm

mikejwoodnz wrote:
rockchucker22 wrote:Weird how I contribute,ask pertinent questions, and they go ignored. Thought this was the easy to get along with group, friendly and such. Not so! :!:


OK this is what Google has to say :
http://www.enzymeinchina.com/3-alpha-amylase.html
"High temperature alpha amylase is a bacterial amylase preparation derived from Bacillus licheniformis extract. With great resistance to high temperature, "

So I guess it can sustain or endure a "higher" temperature without compromising it's action - therefore more suitable for the vagaries of those who do it themselves :D

Awesome thanks for the good info, I had no idea there is a difference!
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Re: enzymes

Postby Seb » Thu Mar 01, 2012 9:28 pm

pintoshine wrote:
On the chemistry bit, did you mean you used "slaked" lime ?
(Calcium oxide - "quicklime" - converted into soluble calcium hydroxide, by the careful addition of water. It gets hot when you do this!)

In a 4L batch of this stuff it took less than a gram to get the ph down to 5.6 or so. So adding enough dry, calcium oxide, made from calcium carbonate and heating quite hot for a long time, which I get from the Mexican food section called Cal. you are right about adding lots of this stuff to water as it would get hot. I only have to add a few milligrams and at an already high temperature.


You made your own quicklime :shock: ? that pretty dangerous with the fumes it makes when cooking
you can buy it at the garden center
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Re: enzymes

Postby pintoshine » Thu Mar 01, 2012 10:19 pm

Mike got to the answer before I did good answer Mike.
pintoshine wrote:which I get from the Mexican food section called Cal
was in the writing. No I don't make my own quicklime. Too cheap to buy it prepackaged. The calcium oxide is good for many things.
In the future I will probably use sulfuric acid and calcium oxide. That way I will get calcium sulfate which is completely insoluble in water.
The answer of the 65 brix is the sucrose equivalent of 65 grams of sugar in a 100ml of water. I got to this level by removing water and reducing the total volume.
http://www.davidberryman.co.uk/technical/density/ here is a very good table of Brix vs specific gravity of sugar in water.
Distill safe. Make good cuts. Enjoy yourself. Give as much as you take. Have fun doing this incredibly hard work. Be a good example. It's your hobby.
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Re: enzymes

Postby pintoshine » Thu Mar 01, 2012 10:28 pm

I forgot to mention that I am working on sample sizes. I am going to have to put 100ml in a 4 oz glass bottle. That will be enough to convert between 125 and 275 kgs of grain. Both enzymes packed separately will be around $15.00. I am pretty sure i can ship this anywhere using FedEx. $$$$ shipping. I can use USPS flat rate within the USA.

For those of you wanting to handle really high rye mash bills, I also have beta-glucanase to break up that blasted beta-glucan protein. That stuff kills filter beds and sticks to heat exchangers making them barely work. $7.50 for 100 ml. This is specified at 0.2 – 0.5 kg/metric ton of substrate so this can treat a lot of grain. at the highest dosage that is 200kgs per 100 ml.

The enzyme is a liquid enzyme preparation produced by fermentation of a selected, non-GMO strain of Trichoderma reesei. This enzyme is a food-grade, Kosher certified, non-synthetic and organic certifiable product. The product is an endo-glucanase enzyme, which catalyzes the breakdown of beta-glucans from barley, malt, cereal grains, gummy fruit like olives as well as other plant materials. The enzyme catalyzes the breakdown of beta-glucans (1,4-beta-,1,3-beta-glucans) to simple sugars. It promotes liquefaction, reduces viscosity, and improves solid/liquid separation, lautering and filtration. The enzyme is essentially free of protease activity.
Distill safe. Make good cuts. Enjoy yourself. Give as much as you take. Have fun doing this incredibly hard work. Be a good example. It's your hobby.
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Re: enzymes

Postby jake_leg » Fri Mar 02, 2012 1:42 am

pintoshine wrote:In the future I will probably use sulfuric acid and calcium oxide. That way I will get calcium sulfate which is completely insoluble in water.


Point of fact Pint, calcium sulphate aka gypsum is sparingly soluble in water - about as soluble as calcium hydroxide. I have a box of it from the home brew shop as a water treatment.

Thanks for distributing these enzymes. I have been wanting to get my hands on some beta glucanase but I can only get it by the litre from the Netherlands.
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Re: enzymes

Postby pintoshine » Fri Mar 02, 2012 1:47 am

Yes that is true but it is quite a bit less soluble than calcium citrate.
Gypsum doesn't have a a bitter taste that calcium citrate has either.
Distill safe. Make good cuts. Enjoy yourself. Give as much as you take. Have fun doing this incredibly hard work. Be a good example. It's your hobby.
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