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Wheat and Glucanase

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Wheat and Glucanase

Postby vickrockafeller » Tue Jun 19, 2018 2:23 pm

I got a lot of unmalted wheat for really cheap. Thinking of doing an all wheat whiskey with a little bit of specialty malt thrown in for flavor, not enzymatic power. Do I need to add a beta-glucanase enzyme to fully break down the starches and get best efficiency, or is it fine to just pitch a gluco-amylase at 140F? I will be fermenting on the grain, so I am not worried about a stuck mash. If I do need to add a beta-glucanase do I just pitch it at the same time as the gluco-amylase since nothing needs to be cooked? Thanks as always.
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Re: Wheat and Glucanase

Postby Swedish Pride » Wed Jun 20, 2018 3:17 am

is this the liquid high temp enzymes you refer too?
If so, do use them as youd normally do with corn, you don't need to cook the wheat as you do corn, but the enzyme works better at the stated temps.
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Re: Wheat and Glucanase

Postby vickrockafeller » Wed Jun 20, 2018 9:55 am

Not talking about a high temp alpha-amylase, but one specifically designed to help with high starch grains like rye and wheat. I'm just not sure if it is used just to help keep things liquid or if it actually helps more starches to covert. Also not sure if the alpha-amylase essentially does the same thing. Think I'll do what SP says. I have some alpha amylase laying around, but no glucanase. Thanks SP.
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Re: Wheat and Glucanase

Postby vickrockafeller » Thu Jun 21, 2018 11:39 pm

https://enzymash.biz/index.php?route=pr ... duct_id=53

This is the enzyme I am talking about.
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