• Advertisement

gin blends

If you made it and you liked it, please share. Questions about the recipes are welcome. Modifications should be placed in seperate topics.

Re: gin blends

Postby Odin » Tue May 22, 2012 6:57 pm

ZG,

Any chance you have a copy of The book on gins & vodka's around in pdf? From Bob Eamons, I think it is ...

Odin.

PS: In a Young Style geneva juniper is actually not a prerequisite. Makes some of them hard to distinguish from a vodka ...
"Great art is created only through diligent and painstaking effort to perfect and polish oneself." by Buddhist filosofer Daisaku Ikeda.
My Blog on distilling: http://istillblog.wordpress.com/
My Site on distilling: http://www.istill.eu/
User avatar
Odin
 
Posts: 666
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 7:36 am
Location: 3 feet below sea level
Equipment type: iStill 50, VISION, 250, ...

Re: gin blends

Postby ZeroGee » Tue May 22, 2012 7:37 pm

Odin wrote:Any chance you have a copy of The book on gins & vodka's around in pdf? From Bob Eamons, I think it is ...
I don't, but you might check with Harry. Amazon also has new and used for less than $5.00
Odin wrote:PS: In a Young Style geneva juniper is actually not a prerequisite. Makes some of them hard to distinguish from a vodka ...
Then, as far as I'm concerned, it's a flavored vodka. Someone else obviously thinks differently (at least for marketing purposes).
User avatar
ZeroGee
 
Posts: 1036
Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2009 7:22 am
Location: Pacific NW - Lower Mainland
Equipment type: Stone & Nixon all copper 2" offset valve-head LM reflux column with a 60L SS electric boiler.

Re: gin blends

Postby Idle Hands » Wed May 23, 2012 7:19 am

On the Angelica seed, maybe a gram per finished liter.
User avatar
Idle Hands
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2008 10:05 pm
Location: the dark side
Equipment type: Alambic

Re: gin blends

Postby ZeroGee » Wed May 23, 2012 7:15 pm

Odin wrote:PS: In a Young Style geneva juniper is actually not a prerequisite. Makes some of them hard to distinguish from a vodka ...
This is from Wikipedia - Jenever (gin): [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jenever]
    Old and young
    There are two types of jenever: oude (old) and jonge (young). This is not a matter of aging, but of distilling techniques. Around 1900, it became possible to distill a high-grade type of alcohol almost neutral in taste, independent of the origin of the spirit. A worldwide tendency for a lighter and less dominant taste, as well as lower prices, led to the development of blended whisky in Great Britain, and in the Netherlands to Jonge Jenever. During the Great War, lack of imported cereals, and hence malt, forced the promotion of this blend. Alcohol derived from molasses from the sugar beet industry was used as an alternative to grain spirit. People started using the term oude for the old-style jenever, and jonge for the new style, which contains more grain instead of malt and can even contain plain sugar-based alcohol. In modern times, jenever distilled from grain and malt only is labeled Graanjenever. Jonge jenever can contain 'no more than' 15% malt wine and 10 grams of sugar per litre. Oude jenever must contain 'at least' 15% malt wine, but no more than 20 g of sugar per litre. Korenwijn (grain wine) is a drink very similar to the 18th century style jenever, and is often matured for a few years in an oak cask; it contains from 51% to 70% malt wine and up to 20 g/l of sugar.

I don't find any references to jonge jenever being juniper-free here or elsewhere. Perhaps I've overlooked something?
User avatar
ZeroGee
 
Posts: 1036
Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2009 7:22 am
Location: Pacific NW - Lower Mainland
Equipment type: Stone & Nixon all copper 2" offset valve-head LM reflux column with a 60L SS electric boiler.

Re: gin blends

Postby rod » Wed May 23, 2012 9:58 pm

Odin wrote:ZG,

Any chance you have a copy of The book on gins & vodka's around in pdf? From Bob Eamons, I think it is ...

Odin.

PS: In a Young Style geneva juniper is actually not a prerequisite. Makes some of them hard to distinguish from a vodka ...


any luck with the pdf
rod
 
Posts: 26
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 12:41 am

Re: gin blends

Postby Odin » Thu May 24, 2012 12:41 am

No luck with the pdf so far!

ZG, the law states that Korenwijn and old jenever need juniper there. For young jenever it is not a legal prerequisite. Some jong jenevers & vodkas are pretty close. I for me say: jenever needs juniper. And most of them do. I think it is not a legal requirement because jonge jenever was developed (partly) during world war I. I think the absence of juniper in that period caused the drink to be made without it. The law underscribes that by stating nothing on juniper in the definition of young jenever.

In general, a jonge jenever is like what we see in England as gin: based on a neutral. Even though there are differences as to herbs, taste, aim, etc.

The old style jenever is really very different from a gin, since it is based on a whiskey, rather than a (grain) neutral.

An old style jenever has at least 15% malt wine (sorta whiskey), but in practice around 40%. Rest is grain neutral.

Korenwijn has (by law) at least 51% malt wine, but is in practice completely made out of malt wine.

Old jenever and Korenwijn can be aged on wood, like whiskies. Up to 20 years. Sweetening is allowed, and so is caramel colouring, but the top shelves don't do that.

Odin.
"Great art is created only through diligent and painstaking effort to perfect and polish oneself." by Buddhist filosofer Daisaku Ikeda.
My Blog on distilling: http://istillblog.wordpress.com/
My Site on distilling: http://www.istill.eu/
User avatar
Odin
 
Posts: 666
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 7:36 am
Location: 3 feet below sea level
Equipment type: iStill 50, VISION, 250, ...

Re: gin blends

Postby ZeroGee » Thu May 24, 2012 8:47 am

Odin – I don’t wish to argue the presence or absence of juniper berries in Dutch production gin nor can I reasonably argue the intricacies of Dutch liquor laws; however, as again defined by Wikipedia (and several dictionaries):


I find it difficult to believe that a beverage generically called “juniper” can legally retain the name without containing at least some small amount of juniper essence.

Further, you claim that during the First World War there were no juniper berries available to make gin in Holland, a statement I find difficult to reconcile with the fact that juniper grows wild throughout Europe, Central Asia, North America and parts of the Middle East and has been farmed specifically for berry production since the late 1600s.

There was, however, a severe grain shortage during that period that required alcohol be extracted from sugar beet molasses. Perhaps you meant that.

Unless you can point to a qualified reference (in English) or to a specific export brand of jenever that contains no juniper essence, I’m left to believe no such product exists.

(I think I mentioned I’m a bit OCD when it comes to gin.)
User avatar
ZeroGee
 
Posts: 1036
Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2009 7:22 am
Location: Pacific NW - Lower Mainland
Equipment type: Stone & Nixon all copper 2" offset valve-head LM reflux column with a 60L SS electric boiler.

Re: gin blends

Postby Idle Hands » Thu May 24, 2012 3:32 pm

I'm the same about absinthe but I love gin as well. I am working up to making some and this thread will help.
User avatar
Idle Hands
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2008 10:05 pm
Location: the dark side
Equipment type: Alambic

Re: gin blends

Postby Odin » Fri May 25, 2012 1:14 am

OCD? No idea what it means. But if it is about gin, I am sure I can say "I am OCD about jenever". Take my word for it. There are young geneva's that are close to vodka & have no juniper. Not my taste, not to my liking, but there are. And juniper was low in WWI. Yes, it grows in the wild, but what was harvested was smuggled out. Like everything else eadible during those years.

I can stupify you with references about jenever, young style, without juniper. In Dutch. Even translated to English, using Google or my own "skills". But I am in no need to convince you. Just sharing my knowledge. Anyone does with it what he/she wants. Or not.

Okay. OCD or not, let's meet half way. Wikipedia? Here you are: Read the part on jonge jenever. Or translate it. And be convinced. Or not. And convinced or not: I am convinced my geneva's should have juniper. All of them.

And what the law says, don't mean much. For whiskey it says like 3 years in a barrel. Or 2. Right. Like original homemade whiskey from America was barreled that long originally. It don't mean much in reference to tradition, but it does have an enormous impact on modern distillers.

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jenever

Odin.
"Great art is created only through diligent and painstaking effort to perfect and polish oneself." by Buddhist filosofer Daisaku Ikeda.
My Blog on distilling: http://istillblog.wordpress.com/
My Site on distilling: http://www.istill.eu/
User avatar
Odin
 
Posts: 666
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 7:36 am
Location: 3 feet below sea level
Equipment type: iStill 50, VISION, 250, ...

Re: gin blends

Postby zedzedtop » Fri May 25, 2012 1:38 am

This stuff is really nice. It's like the hills around here condensed in a bottle. Forest elixir. The terroir gin:

http://www.stgeorgespirits.com/gin/
'Bubble cap plates are better for batch distillation than perforated plates' - Benjamin Franklin

Fortune cookie: Your whole family are well
User avatar
zedzedtop
 
Posts: 2524
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:20 pm
Location: NorCal
Equipment type: 25G pot, gas or 4500w
pot head or 4'' 3plate bubbler, cm

Re: gin blends

Postby ZeroGee » Fri May 25, 2012 7:39 am

Odin wrote:OCD? No idea what it means.
OCD means “Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.”

Odin wrote:I can stupify you with references about jenever, young style, without juniper. In Dutch. Even translated to English, using Google or my own "skills". But I am in no need to convince you... Wikipedia? Here you are: Read the part on jonge jenever.
Please read my reference above.
Odin wrote:I am convinced my geneva's should have juniper. All of them.
I can't agree more!

I suspect we're making the same argument using different words.
zedzedtop wrote:This stuff is really nice. It's like the hills around here condensed in a bottle. Forest elixir. The terroir gin:
http://www.stgeorgespirits.com/gin/
Sounds lovely, but it's not on the :ranting: BC Liquor Distribution Board list. I'll have to wait until I get back to the States. I think I've heard of it before - in glowing terms. Any ideas about their recipe?
User avatar
ZeroGee
 
Posts: 1036
Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2009 7:22 am
Location: Pacific NW - Lower Mainland
Equipment type: Stone & Nixon all copper 2" offset valve-head LM reflux column with a 60L SS electric boiler.

Re: gin blends

Postby zedzedtop » Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:42 pm

Not sure how they put all the ingredients together, but it might inspire me to experiment with evergreen/conifer tips. I was thinking about other ways to get forest smells into the bottle. One of the dominant smells to me is a sort of humus and mycellium smell. I wonder if a vapour infusion of a big clod of mycellium would do the trick? 'Spose you'd want to know what the species was, save you making an 'elixir de galerina autumnalis.' :shock: :shock: :shock:

how about moss, redwood bark, and banana slugs (diried)?
'Bubble cap plates are better for batch distillation than perforated plates' - Benjamin Franklin

Fortune cookie: Your whole family are well
User avatar
zedzedtop
 
Posts: 2524
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:20 pm
Location: NorCal
Equipment type: 25G pot, gas or 4500w
pot head or 4'' 3plate bubbler, cm

Re: gin blends

Postby punkin » Fri Jun 15, 2012 4:01 pm

Mycellium all seem to have their own smell. Very different from each other. Pink Oysters smell like old denim. :mg:

Some experienced mycologists can identify species by smell alone. It's cool.


You could order spawn and do a distillation or infusion. Shitake on sawdust or something else neutral may be the go. Even grain spawn.
Image

Identified Shit Stirrer, upgraded to sociopath.

To the fashionable nationalists



http://www.stilldragon.com.au for all your distilling needs in Australia and New Zealand
User avatar
punkin
 
Posts: 11353
Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2007 2:09 pm
Location: Northern NSW Orstrailya

Re: gin blends

Postby zedzedtop » Fri Jun 15, 2012 4:24 pm

I think the temperate woodlover mycellium smell fantastic, sort of cream/eggwhite/ozone.
'Bubble cap plates are better for batch distillation than perforated plates' - Benjamin Franklin

Fortune cookie: Your whole family are well
User avatar
zedzedtop
 
Posts: 2524
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:20 pm
Location: NorCal
Equipment type: 25G pot, gas or 4500w
pot head or 4'' 3plate bubbler, cm

Re: gin blends

Postby Odin » Sat Jun 16, 2012 10:42 am

I just got some Juniper Virginiana over from the US of A. Smells great. Not as strong as Juniperus Communis, but it has a more delicate, fir-like smell. Looking forward to using it in my geneva.

Odin.
"Great art is created only through diligent and painstaking effort to perfect and polish oneself." by Buddhist filosofer Daisaku Ikeda.
My Blog on distilling: http://istillblog.wordpress.com/
My Site on distilling: http://www.istill.eu/
User avatar
Odin
 
Posts: 666
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 7:36 am
Location: 3 feet below sea level
Equipment type: iStill 50, VISION, 250, ...

PreviousNext

Return to Proven Recipes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest