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wheat germ

If you made it and you liked it, please share. Questions about the recipes are welcome. Modifications should be placed in seperate topics.

Re: wheat germ

Postby minime » Tue Apr 23, 2013 7:02 pm

Greasydog26 wrote:So this is my very first ferment as I followed the instructions closely. After the wash cooled I added my Red star champagne yeast and the ferment had a SG of 1.080. After about four days the SG didn’t change much, maybe 1.070, and then I added some EC-1118 and things started to spark up a little more. The temperature has been between 70 and 74 F. As of now the SG is 1.050 a week in today. I guess I would have just figured it would have been a little further along than this. Does this sound about right given the temperature and should I let the SG go to 1.000? It sure is starting to smell good and I’m excited to run my first batch. Any help is much appreciated.


1118 will ferment cold but bump it up to 85F and it'll get you to .98 pretty quick. It's not the fastest yeast on the planet though.
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Re: wheat germ

Postby Greasydog26 » Tue Apr 23, 2013 8:08 pm

OK thanks minime!!!
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Re: wheat germ

Postby ZeroGee » Wed Apr 24, 2013 6:38 am

Greasydog26 -- Not knowing your equipment, I will assume you’re using a 30 liter (25 L measured) polyethylene beer fermenter from your LHBS. I will also assume you have a gravitometer (the glass float that shows your specific gravity) you used to verify your starting SG.

With these tools, and a set of distilling calculators (http://www.forum.moderndistiller.com/viewtopic.php?f=36&t=979&p=12850&hilit=calcs#p12802) you can download, thanks to the Modern Distiller blog, and calculate sugar and water for any wash you like. This is a very handy set of calculators.

To your question, however: you had a starting SG of 1.08 which should provide 12.9% ABV with an ending SG of 0.98. This is well within the reach of both Red Star champagne and EC-1118 yeasts (around 18% max) – so too much sugar isn’t the problem.

I also assume you followed the directions on the yeast packets on how to start the yeast prior to adding to the sugar wash. If not, read and follow the directions on the packet(s). You need a strong start.

Two things might have happened, you have outdated yeast packets or there are insufficient nutrients for the yeast (although the cooked wheat germ should be sufficient by itself). Both problems can be fixed at your LHBS.

Finally, for no known reason, the ferment will just take its own sweet damn time. I’ve had the same thing happen to me twice and one took almost four weeks to finish. Both times were during the winter. But it’s worth the wait. Wheat germ recipes are some of the best flavored of all.
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Re: wheat germ

Postby Greasydog26 » Sat Apr 27, 2013 6:41 pm

Thanks guys for all the help!!!
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Re: wheat germ

Postby Foxfire » Wed Oct 02, 2013 9:09 pm

Anyone have opinion on toasted vs non toasted wheatgerm? I can get the non toasted variety for like .79 pound at the bulk store, toasted is like 3x that amount. Does it make diff?
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Re: wheat germ

Postby pintoshine » Wed Oct 02, 2013 9:46 pm

I haven't noticed much difference. It is mostly the oil and the nutrients that are the flavoring.
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Re: wheat germ

Postby Foxfire » Sun Oct 06, 2013 6:31 pm

Would there be any point to using either malting enzymes or rye malt in this after the cooking?
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Re: wheat germ

Postby pirobot668 » Thu May 22, 2014 12:48 pm

Just finished a run of this yummy stuff, with a variation.
8 lbs. white sugar, dissolved in two gallons water, gently boiled with 1/2 tsp. 'Fruit-Fresh". Citric/ascorbic acid mix. Invert sugar...
2 lbs. frozen 'baby white corn' or 'sweet white corn'. Fry in skillet with tiny amount of butter, about 1/2 cup at a time. Going for light golden-brown sear on about 1/3 the kernels. Blender the fried corn with enough water to make thick soup, add 1/2 tsp. Amylase to the slurry.
1 - 12 oz. jar 'toasted' wheat germ goes into boiling sugar solution, lightly boil until wheat-germ oil form on the surface of the water.
Add creamed-corn to sugary mess, sir in well, another 1/2 hour boiling.
Strain off most of the solids, add cool water to bring to four gallons.
Cool to around 90-95, pitch 'champagne yeast'.
Distilled twice; first time the stuff louched at 90 degrees F! Too much flavor!!!!
Second pass, much better.
Rolled it around on some oak-chips, better still.
This makes my eleventh Wheat Germ batch, and the first with Corn.
Maybe this is B'Urban.
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Re: wheat germ

Postby pirobot668 » Thu May 22, 2014 12:56 pm

The details:
The invert-time for the sugar was about 45 minutes, the 'creamed corn' had an enzyme rest around two hours before going into the kettle, the simmering time for the wheat germ was about 45 minutes.
All solids were removed prior to fermenting, not just 'floaters'.
Initial yield was under 5 pints of 110 proof, after second distillation (more careful cuts!) it is a little more than 5 pints of 85 proof.
Oak-chips had been soaking in earlier batch of DWWG for over two years; very pungent....
The stuff still louches, but at temps under 70 F. Clear when over that temp.....
The mouth-feel, the depth and complexity are there with Wheat-Germ. With Corn? Whole new game.....
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Re: wheat germ

Postby apoplectic epileptic » Mon Jun 02, 2014 7:03 pm

Foxfire wrote:Anyone have opinion on toasted vs non toasted wheatgerm? I can get the non toasted variety for like .79 pound at the bulk store, toasted is like 3x that amount. Does it make diff?



It is likely the plethora of amino acids in wheat germ that 'turbo charge' the wgw and the cooking that helps break the longer chain aminos into shorter ones, the heat of toasting may help or hinder the results but in the recipe there is way more than enough of the nutrients/amino acids that it probably won't matter in terms of ferment speed.
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Re: wheat germ

Postby apoplectic epileptic » Wed Jun 11, 2014 3:13 am

I wonder if anyone has used a pressure cooker to reduce the cooking time for the wheat germ. I have cooked and canned a lot in pressure cooker/canner and own 4 of them of varying sizes. Pressure canners can reduce the cooking time of, say, split peas from hours down to 15 minutes or so.

Just wondering, and a suggestion... I guess scorching and/or puking may be a concern but I have cooked stuff you're not supposed to cook in pressure cookers for those reasons (wheat flour, split peas) and didn't have a problem, just stir as normal until near/at boiling point before putting on lid.
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