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An experimental, centrifugal filter.

Any sort that runs continuous. Examples are beer stripping stills that have a continuously, vodka stills fed from a beer stripper or any sort of spirit doubler, meaning continuously fed pot still.

An experimental, centrifugal filter.

Postby Abussive » Sun Aug 05, 2012 4:36 am

Following the "no particulates" path, as I am for the time being, I needed a reliable, simple means to get crystal clear wash without waiting forever for that to happen via Mother Nature (gravity).
So... I decided to amplify gravity in the well-understood manner.....
I used a small permanent-magnet (model racing car) motor out of the "squirrel's odds-and-ends box" to spin up at about 10,000 RPM. It's good for about 20,000 RPM, but I only used 5V to drive it.....intially at least!
Very little power is required, by the way.
As a guide to size, the rotor cylinder is about 60mm (2.5 inches) diameter.
Everything was made on the lathe by turning between centres to maintain accurate centring and balance. It really isn't as difficult as might be imagined, once you jump in.
But everything MUST be as balanced as possible, else vibration dominates when you start to spin it up. To the point of destruction if you do a really bad job!
I left the Allen Key inserted through the outer cup so that you could see how the cylinder attaches to the motor shaft. The liquid feed-tube hole through the cup, to the rotor is not easy to see.... it is near to the motor casing in a South-East direction. The outer cup is screwed into the downward-facing part of the motor casing. It therefore is static and merely collects the liquid flung outward and deflects it downwards.

Although not shown, a counterbalancing Cap Screw sits as a "dummy" weight at the opposite side of the rotor shaft.... makes final balancing much easier!

Image




The core of the filter is a recessed aluminium cylinder mounted on a shaft using a taper-fit secured with a nut (bit like old-fashioned car wire wheels!) The idea being that the support point is down at the bottom of the cylinder, allowing feed liquid in through the gap at the top, WHILST IT IS SPINNING.
Liquid gets forced centrifugally to the extremity of the inside, and appears to defy Gravity - sticking to the inner wall. It can only escape when there is enough liquid to get over the "step" seen at the top cylinder surface. That is the only way out. It hits the sides of the inverted cup (a recycled Jelly Beans pot!) and falls, crystal-clear into the collection container (or funnel attached to one).

Here is the rotor cylinder:

Image

And from below showing the nut and taper-fit union.

Image


So, wash is trickled in and once the liquid capacity is reached, wash gets sprayed out over the top "step". But between times, artificial gravity (many times normal) pulls sediment into the bottom of the internal cavity - the rotor wall. The sediment STAYS there because it is more dense than the liquid.

OK, you spotted the limitation: once the cavity is full of sediment, sediment WILL spray out too! But even a tiny prototype like this easily manages the sediment in a couple of gallons of my simple experimental sugar washes.....


I feel quite sure that ways can be found to periodically "scrape" captured sediment away without stopping the spinning process, but for now at least, I do actually use it in batch-mode.

May be of use to pot stillers from time-to-time too?

:)
Adonis

Scientist, technocrat, 2nd-rate musician, improviser
m.o. :- "why buy it, if you can make it exactly as you want it"?
Mantra:- Measure twice, cut once. My short pencil is better than your long memory
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Re: An experimental, centrifugal filter.

Postby jake_leg » Sun Aug 05, 2012 8:30 am

Good idea. There are juicers that work on the centrifugal principal.

Image
I remember Aaron Schnell
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Re: An experimental, centrifugal filter.

Postby minime » Sun Aug 05, 2012 12:47 pm

I like Butch's better :mg:

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=4581&p=67023
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Re: An experimental, centrifugal filter.

Postby Abussive » Sun Aug 05, 2012 1:14 pm

minime wrote:I like Butch's better

I'm not into self-flaggellation.....with fragmented metal!

I'm only concerned with removing a few grams of sediment.

Even so, 10,000+ RPM is not to be trifled with by the foolhardy! Plenty enough energy in even my tiny rotor to take a finger or two right off! Or an eye, or even a face, if curiosity takes over from wisdom.

So like messing with miniature gas turbine engines, DON'T stand in the danger zone: (anywhere projected from the rotor's radius!)
It's the bit where you think your design and build skills supreme that fail.... SUPREMELY!

:doh:
Adonis

Scientist, technocrat, 2nd-rate musician, improviser
m.o. :- "why buy it, if you can make it exactly as you want it"?
Mantra:- Measure twice, cut once. My short pencil is better than your long memory
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Re: An experimental, centrifugal filter.

Postby pockets » Sun Feb 17, 2013 10:52 pm

Walk in cooler works great. 50 deg f makes all solids fall out in 30the mins. Racking crane with wort pump with inline filter and wha la. Nice design though.
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