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A beta-glucanase discussion

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A beta-glucanase discussion

Postby Zymurgy Bob » Fri Nov 14, 2014 1:30 pm

Although much of this is a request for information from Pint, it may also be of interest to anyone using Pint's agitated enzyme corn mashing procedure.

I bought from Pint a package of 3 enzymes, SEBAmyl-GL, SEBFlo-TL, and SEBStar-HTL, I've used the SEBAmyl and SEBStar to mash ground corn blends (hen scratch) as demonstrated by Pint in his video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtnboJ3Kxeo), and I've had excellent results, far improved over any corn mashing I ever did with my own methods, even if the separation of the last of the sweet wort from the remaining solids was a bit more work than I liked. I've yet to use, however, or figure out how to use, the SEBFlo beta-glucanase, and if such information is in the video, I've missed it.

From what reading I've been able to find, beta-glucan molecules are similar to starch molecules, in that they are many glucose molecules bound together, but that some of the bonds in beta glucans are beta-glycosidic bonds, as opposed to the alpha-glycosodic bonds in starch, and those beta-glycosidic bonds are not lysed by our amylase enzymes to form simple sugars, while the alpha-glycosidic-bonded starch is lysed by the amylase enzymes to form the simple sugars we want.

Because I also know (or at least I think I know) that beta glucans are the gummy, nasty stuff, that makes corn mashing hard to deal with, I figured that using the SEBFlow beta glucanase should lyse those beta-glycosidic bonds, and reduce that gummy stuff to fermentable sugars, a win-win. Holding that thought, I went looking for information on beta glucanase, and found this: " A β-glucanase rest done at 40 °C (104 °F) is practiced in order to break down cell walls and make starches more available, thus raising the extraction efficiency. Should the brewer let this rest go on too long, it is possible that a large amount of β-glucan will dissolve into the mash, which can lead to a stuck mash on brew day, and cause filtration problems later in beer production." from this site http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mashing.

From this, it sounds like a beta glucanase enzyme reaction can actually cause liquid retension problems, rather than solving them. Can anyone shed any light on this?
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Re: A beta-glucanase discussion

Postby punkin » Fri Nov 14, 2014 2:34 pm

I read it to say the rest makes the beta glucose available as starch and that that starch can cause stuck sparges and haze. Adding the enzyme is not mentioned in that extract but that should take care of those released starches, as you say, and turn them to sugars which will be converted during the ferment.

Won't help with sparging UNLESS you ferment on the grain and the additiom of the enzyme should help in an ongrain sparge/sqeeze and an increase in yeild/decrease in haze.
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Re: A beta-glucanase discussion

Postby Zymurgy Bob » Fri Nov 14, 2014 2:48 pm

Well, I like your interpretation better than (what I think was) mine, and I do ferment on the grain, so that part's no problem. I kind of assumed that the stated rest temperature aligned with the activity temperature of some naturally-occuring beta-glucanase enzyme, but not necessarily the activity temperature of the fungally-derived enzyme Pint sells. Hopefully he'll chime in what that temp range is.

Thanks for the input.
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Re: A beta-glucanase discussion

Postby Mud » Fri Nov 14, 2014 6:38 pm

This is an excerpt from an email thread with a sales rep from the manufacturer:

Hey *redacted to protect the innocent*,

It was good talking to you today and I think some of the following might be of some use to you…

High temperature processing.

SEBstar HTL = High temperature alpha-amylase
SEBamyl GL = Glucoamylase
SEBflo TL = Beta-glucanase


With regards to distillery mashes from starch we usually recommend a two-fold approach of Liquefaction and Saccharification. Before that though, we might want to handle that beta-glucan problem…



1. Liquefaction - Taking the mash to a high temperature of 175-185 F, and using a high temp alpha-amylase (SEBstar HTL) to break the starches down into dextrins. Recommend an iodine test every 10-15min to confirm complete conversion.

The alpha-amylase is a random cutter, so there will be large and small dextrins (random sugars) created in this process.



2. Once the grain has been added to the mash, add beta-glucanase (SEBflo TL) below 160 F. Try to keep the SEBflo TL in the 100 – 160 F range for 30 min minimum. This enzyme will break down the viscosity increasing beta-glucans of the grain and prevent a stuck mash.

a. Beta-glucans are present in: Wheat, Barley, and Rye in significant amounts. Other grains will not be, or will be only partially affected by Beta-glucanase (SEBflo TL). Adjust dosing as necessary.

b. Alternately this can be added on the cool down after liquefaction. Add SEBflo TL after the mash gets below 160 F if the mash viscosity becomes an issue.



3. Saccharification - Cool the mash down to about 140 F and add a glucoamylase (SEBamyl GL) will help in saccharification. Do not add until the mash temperature is 140 F or so, the enzyme will denature. This enzyme will turn all the larger dextrins (3,4,5 chain sugars) into small sugars that the yeast can eat to make more ethanol.

Recommend holding the 135 F temperature for 1 hour before continued cooling to fermentation temperatures, but it is your choice.
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Re: A beta-glucanase discussion

Postby Zymurgy Bob » Fri Nov 14, 2014 8:04 pm

Perfect, Mud, and thanks a bunch, but who's kidding whom with that "innocent" stuff? :roflmao:
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Re: A beta-glucanase discussion

Postby 3d0g » Sat Nov 15, 2014 9:24 am

My experience matches (redacted)'s advice. SEBflo is pretty useless for corn. It's darn near magical for rye though.
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